Rules FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions about the rules of petanque

– For general questions about petanque (“Is petanque the same as bocce?”) visit All About Petanque.
– For discussions of individual rules, see A Guide to the Rules of Petanque.
– Some questions (below) link to answers on this page. Others link to blog posts on this site.

Table of Contents

  1. I want to build my own petanque terain. What are the dimensions of a court?
  2. What is an obstacle?
  3. What is a mène (an end)?
  4. When does a mene (end, round) start and finish?

    What do you do when…

  5. … the jack is shot out-of-bounds and goes dead?
  6. … a boule goes out-of-bounds, then bounces back in-bounds?
  7. ….the two teams’ best boules are the same distance from the jack?
  8. … ALL boules are shot out-of-bounds?
  9. … a boule is played out of turn?
  10. … one team forgets that it has an unplayed boule?
  11. …. a player picks up the circle before all boules have been thrown? 
  12. If the first boule thrown goes out-of-bounds, which team throws next?
  13. Can a team challenge the jack after it has just thrown the first boule?
  14. Is there any rule about the order in which members of the same team play?
  15. Can a teammate indicate the donnee by standing near it?
  16. In time-limited games, when a tie occurs why play TWO additional rounds?
  17. What are the rules for the jack’s weight, size, and so on?
  18. Is a boule dead if it hits something overhead? The ceiling? A tree branch?
  19. Is it OK to leave unplayed boules on the ground?
  20. What is a “boule thrown contrary to rules”?
  21. I don’t understand the rule about “stepping back” and moving the circle.
  22. There is a shooting competition. Is there also a pointing competition?
  23. What are the rules for the colored penalty cards?

    MYTHICAL RULES
    These are rules that petanque players often think are rules of the game.

  24. Is it true? You can’t wear gloves while playing
  25. Is it true? You can’t fix a divot with your hand (only with a foot).
  26. Is it true? You can’t fix a divot before throwing the first boule in a game.
  27. Is it true? You can’t fix a divot if you’re going to shoot.
  28. Is it true? You are not allowed to throw underarm (palm up).
  29. Is it true? All of a player’s boules must be from a matching set.
  30. Is it true? You can groom the terrain between ends.
  31. Is it true? Coloring of boules is prohibited
  32. Is it true? You can’t wear open-toe shoes or sandals
  33. Is it true? A team loses the points it won in a mene if the points aren’t recorded on the scoreboard before the start of the next mene
  34. Is it true? You can’t throw a jack to within 2 meters of another jack.
  35. Is it true? A player can’t throw more than two boules in a row.



If the first boule thrown goes out-of-bounds, which team throws next?  ▲

Article 15 says—

If the first boule played goes into an out-of-bounds area, it is for the opponent to play, then alternately as long as there are no boules in the in-bounds area.

It is easy to remember what to do in such a situation, because it is simply a special case case of an undecided-point situation. The throw of the jack creates an undecided point situation by creating an empty-terrain situation. The rules for which team throws next (after the throw of the jack) are exactly the same as the rules for which team throws next after the throw of a boule creates an empty-terrain situation.

After the throw of the jack, the teams play alternately, starting with the team that threw the jack. They throw until one of the teams gains the point. Typically this happens when team A throws the first boule. Team A gains the point, resolving the undecided point situation.

But if that does NOT happen—if team A’s first boule goes out-of-bounds, leaving the point still undecided—then alternate play continues, and team B throws next.

In the unlikely event that team B’s first boule also goes out-of-bounds (that is, fails to decide the point) then team A throws next. Alternate play continues until one of the teams manages to decide the point by throwing a boule that stays in-bounds.



Can a team challenge the jack after it has just thrown the first boule?  ▲

Article 8 states that “If after the throwing of the jack, a first boule is played, the opponent still has the right to question (contest) the validity of its position.” At that point, does the team that threw the first boule also still have the right to question the validity of the position of the jack?

No. Each team has the right to question the validity of the position of the thrown jack until it (the team) throws its first boule. By the act of throwing its first boule, a team accepts the position of the jack and gives up the right to question that position.


Is there any rule about the order in which members of the same team play?  ▲

No. When you’re playing doubles or triples, members of the same team can play in any order that they wish. If you watch petanque tournaments on Youtube, you will see that the team member that plays is determined by circumstance. If the team needs to point, then the team’s best pointer will throw. If the team needs to shoot, then the team’s best shooter will throw.

See also our discussion of the mythical rule A player can’t throw more than two boules in a row.


Can a teammate indicate the donnee by standing near it?  ▲

YES — that’s OK.

Article 15 says that

A player is not allowed to help himself by using any object, nor to draw a line on the ground to guide his boule or to mark his intended landing spot [donnée].

donne_indicated_with_a_toeGiven that you can’t place anything on the terrain to mark the donnée, players sometimes wonder if it is OK for a teammate to indicate the desired donnée by pointing with a toe.

The answer is YES — that’s OK.

Article 15 is designed to forbid making physical changes to the terrain. As long as no change is made to the terrain, it is perfectly OK for a teammate simply to stand and point with a toe.



In time-limited games, when a tie occurs why play TWO additional rounds? Why not ONE extra round? ▲

This is in Article 19 of Règlement des Championnats du Monde de Pétanque, the rules for FIPJP world championship matches.

All games in the World Championships are played to 13 points, with the exception of games to which a time limit is applied: an hour and a quarter for the Men’s World Championship, one hour for others. Games may not end with a tied score (un match nul); a tied game will be played two additional menes if no team reaches 13 points.

When time-limited games were first introduced, when the whistle sounded any mene in progress was played to its finish. At that point, if one of the teams was in the lead, then that team was the winner. If the score was tied, one extra mene was played.

With this rule in place, as the time-limit drew near teams in the lead would deliberately play slowly, “running out the clock” and limiting their opponents’ opportunities to score more points. The FIPJP apparently considered this tactic to be contrary to the spirit of the game. As a result, the rules were changed to allow TWO ends after the whistle. (Note that after TWO extra menes a game might still be tied, requiring a THIRD extra mene to break the tie.)

This rule has been effect for several years, and umpires seem happy with it. Most time-limited games finish in 90 minutes or less. This is reliable enough to allow ancillary activities (meal breaks, TV broadcasts) to be scheduled with confidence.


Is a boule dead if it hits something overhead? The ceiling? A tree branch? ▲

Think of the out-of-bounds lines as invisible walls extending upward into the sky from the strings or marks on the ground. A boule that goes through one of those walls is dead, but hitting something above the ground INSIDE those walls doesn’t kill it.

If you look at things that way, then objects above the terrain are clearly not out-of-bounds. They are parts of the terrain. If a boule hits a low-hanging tree branch, a light fixture suspended over the terrain, or even the ceiling of a covered boulodrome, that is essentially the same as hitting a stone on the ground. You get a bad bounce, you call it bad luck, and keep playing.
seaside_terrain_with_lights



This is a shooting competition. Is there also a pointing competition? ▲

No. There isn’t an FIPJP pointing competition.

There are both practical and theoretical problems with a pointing competition. On the practical side— pointing is different from shooting because successful pointing is heavily dependent on the playing surface, and the very act of playing a boule changes the playing surface. Ensuring consistency of the playing surface is virtually impossible.

On the theoretical side— there are questions about what should count as successful pointing, how to score the competition, and the obstacles and events in the competition. Should there be different events for rolling, demi-lob, and high lob? For left and right spin? Should we measure accuracy in hitting a donnee or accuracy in getting near the jack or both? Should a boule in front score higher than one in back? How do you score a boule that pushes the jack back, but ends up kissing it? Should promoting a boule be one of the events? Etc. Etc.


MYTHICAL RULES


Is it true? You can’t wear gloves while playing. ▲

No. It is not true.

Article 15 says that “A player may not help himself by using any object, nor draw a line on the ground to guide his boule or to mark his intended landing spot.” It is sometimes suggested that a glove is an object that would help a player, and that wearing gloves is therefore forbidden by Article 15.

That is a misinterpretation of Article 15. The purpose of Article 15 is to forbid making physical changes to the terrain. That includes drawing lines on the terrain and placing “any object” (e.g. a stick or stone) on the terrain.

It is sometimes argued that gloves give a player an “unfair advantage”. But even if gloves do provide some kind of assistance (e.g. warm hands on a cold day), there is nothing unfair about it— all players are permitted to wear gloves if they wish.


Is it true? You can’t fix a divot with your hand (only with a foot). ▲

No.   The rules do not specify how you must fill a hole. Using your hand is allowed.

A related question is

“What are you allowed to do, when filling a hole? Just scrape a little dirt over it with your foot? Or are you allowed to tamp it down a bit?”

As we’ve said, there are no specific rules about what you can and cannot do when filling a hole. Anything that a human being can do using only his/her body is certainly allowed. After the hole is filled, a little extra tamping and stamping with the feet will make no significant difference in the terrain. But if it makes you feel better, go ahead and do it.


Is it true? You can’t fix a divot before throwing the first boule in a game. ▲

NO, it is not true.

Before 2008, Article 10 said that a player was allowed to fill only the hole made by the boule that had been previously thrown. This wording suggested that the player who throws the first boule in a game might not be allowed to fill a divot, because no boule had been previously thrown in that game. The wording of Article 10 was modified in 2008 to insure that Article 10 would not be interpreted in that way. The current wording of Article 10 is

the player who is about to play, or one of his partners, may fill in a hole that was made by a boule played earlier.

The bottom line is that a player, before throwing, may fill one hole in the terrain that was created by the impact of a boule, regardless of whether that boule was thrown in the same game or in an earlier game.


Is it true? You can’t fix a divot if you’re going to shoot.

No, it is not true.

A player fixed a divot on the terrain, then went back to the circle and shot!! Is he allowed to do that!?

This indignant question arises from the (true) thought that the purpose of fixing a divot is to keep the divot from interfering with a pointed boule. So… is a player allowed to fix a divot even if he doesn’t intent to point?

The answer is YES— he is. There are a variety of reasons why a player might choose to fix a divot before shooting. But those reasons, and a player’s plans for how he’s going to throw his boule, have absolutely no bearing on his right to fill a hole in the terrain.

In 2015, umpires in some French competitions started enforcing a rule that “If you’re going to shoot, you can’t fill in a hole. If you fill a hole, you must point your next boule.” Basically, the organizers of those competitions (and perhaps the French national petanque federation) decided to add that rule to the rules for those competitions. But that decision did not change the FIPJP rules.



Is it true? You are not allowed to throw underarm (palm up). ▲

No. It is not true. The rules say nothing about how a boule must be thrown, so it is legal to throw a boule any way you want. Petanque is typically played on a rough and uneven surface, so throwing, rather than rolling, the boule is usually the most effective technique for putting a petanque boule in motion. (See our page on How to throw a boule.) On the other hand, a palm-up rolling throw can be a good choice when pointing long distances over relatively smooth ground, or if you have shoulder or arm issues. And it is perfectly legal.


Is it true? All of a player’s boules must be from a matching set. ▲

No. It is not true. It is completely legal to play with “odd boules” – boules that don’t all come from the same matched set. The only requirement is that each individual boule must be valid. That is, each individual boule must be from an FIPJP-certified manufacturer, the required manufacturer’s markings must still be legible, etc.


Is it true? You can groom the terrain between ends. ▲

NO. The relevant is in Article 10 —

It is strictly forbidden for players to press down, displace or crush any obstacle whatsoever that is located on the game terrain.

This rule is generally interpreted as a broad prohibition on altering the terrain in any way during a game, including raking or “grooming” the terrain. The prohibition is in effect from the time that the game officially begins with the first successful throw of the jack.

HOWEVER… Local rules may allow raking the terrain during a game. There is, for example, a form of petanque in which the players always throw from the end of the terrain, so that the center of the terrain gets used quite heavily. In this form of petanque the center of the terrain is often raked between menes.



Is it true? Coloring of boules is prohibited. ▲

No. Usually coloring boules is OK, depending on where the paint is.

People sometimes believe that you cannot paint boules because this contravenes Article 2’s clause forbidding “tampering” with boules. But the prohibition on tampering is primarily meant to prevent re-heating a boule to change its hardness, and drilling a hole into the boule and filling it with something. Putting paint, fingernail polish, or a permanent marker in the grooves (striations) and markings of a boule isn’t considered to be tampering. Paint inside the striations and markings will not come into contact with the ground or with other boules, so it will not affect the performance of the boule. Any paint that overflows the grooves will quickly wear off during normal play.

During tournament play, umpires will probably reject any boule that is
entirely covered in paint, out of concern that the paint will change the playing properties of the boule. Some national federations (e.g. the Dutch federation) do not permit any kind of paint at all during sanctioned play. (See our Guide to the Rules of Petanque for more information.) The bottom line— paint in striations and markings is perfectly acceptable in social play. In an organized tournament, check with the tournament organizers.


Is it true? A team loses the points it won in a mene if the points aren’t recorded on the scoreboard before the start of the next mene. ▲

This is not a recognized rule of petanque… you won’t find it in the FIPJP rules. However, there are petanque leagues in Spain that have adopted a LOCAL rule of “Put your score on the scoreboard or lose it”. Players returning to the UK after vacationing and playing in Spain, sometimes come back with the mistaken impression that this is one of the standard rules of petanque.

The FIPJP rules say nothing about how the score is recorded. In fact, there is no requirement that the score must be physically recorded in any way at all. It is perfectly legal for players to keep the score in their heads. The bottom line is that (except, perhaps, in local rules) The score is the score, whether or not it has been recorded on the scoreboard.

As a practical matter, it is a good idea to record the score in some way. If the score is being recorded on a scoreboard, generally speaking the winning team is the party that updates the scoreboard. BOTH teams, however, should consider it their responsibility to see that the scoreboard is updated correctly after the agreement of points.


Is it true? You can’t throw a jack to within 2 meters of another jack (a jack in a neighboring game). ▲

No, it is not true. But there are reasons why one would expect it to be true.

The FIPJP rules contain several one-meter rules (about the circle and the thrown jack) designed to keep the circle away from obstacles. There is also a two-meter rule in Article 6.

The throwing circle … must be drawn (or placed) more than a meter from any obstacle and, for competitions on open terrains, at least 2 meters from another throwing circle in use.

Given the way it is written, the two-meter rule applies only (a) to two circles (b) in games played on unmarked terrains. That means that, despite what you would expect on the basis of analogies with the one-meter rules, the two-meter rule—

  1. is NOT applicable in games played on marked terrains.
  2. does NOT apply to the distance between two jacks.
  3. does NOT apply to the distance between a jack and a circle.

It would be an improvement if the two-meter rule did apply in those circumstances. But the fact of the matter is that, as it is currently written (2010 revision of the FIPJP rules), it does not. Note also that this rule may be modified by competition organizers and particular national federations. For more information, see A Guide to the Rules of Petanque.


Is it true? A player can’t throw more than two boules in a row. ▲

No, it is not true. But some clubs have adopted this as a local rule.

The rule says that when playing doubles (where each player on a team has three boules) the same player cannot play more than two boules in a row before letting the other player on the team throw. I don’t know the reason why some clubs have adopted this rule. But it is definitely a LOCAL rule, and not one of the national or international rules of petanque.


 ▲f

3 thoughts on “Rules FAQs

  1. An interesting thing came up today. We were playing on an enclosed piste. Team A had 4 boules left. Team B threw its last boule, which hit the jack and continued to the board (out of bounds), came back, and hit the jack which was going out of play. Which then stayed in play…

    We find no ruling on this. Can you help please. We know it is only a game… BUT!!?


    Jules says—
    See https://petanquerules.wordpress.com/2014/05/01/zombie-boules/

  2. “the jack must be a minimum of 1 metre from any obstacle and from the nearest boundary of an out-of-bounds area.”

    Does this mean the jack must be in the centre 1 metre if you play on a marked terrain of 12 x 3 m (and between 6 and 10 metres from the throwing circle)? That is 1 metre from the left and 1 metre from the right string.


    Jules says—
    See https://petanquerules.wordpress.com/2015/07/09/landing-strip/

  3. Which set of rules is now in effect? FIPJP still links to the 2010 rules on the website. But FFPJP has a version that appears to have been updated in February 2015 (according to the last page). Here is a link: http://bit.ly/2afMALp. Unfortunately, my French isn’t good enough to quickly determine if this is really a new rules set.


    Jules says—
    As of August 1, 2016, the FIPJP rules are still those approved in 2010. It seems likely that there will be a new revision later this year (December 2016).

    The date of any specific national version is not a good indicator of the FIPJP version upon which it is based. Many national federations update the date of their version of the rules in January, even if there has been no change in the text. The idea, I take it, is to indicate that “these are the rules that this national federation will use during this year”.

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